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Asian American Theology Colloquium

April 5 at 10:00 a.m.

“Asian American Theology: Promise and Challenge”

Princeton Theological Seminary is pleased to host a colloquium on Asian American theology. The colloquium places Asian American theologians and ministers in dialogue for the sake of identifying major issues facing Asian American Christianity. The colloquium will also give testimony to the unique gifts and vision of the Asian American church. Roundtable discussions will further the conversation among presenters as well as those in attendance. Topics that will be addressed include race, issues of moral authority (especially along intergenerational and gender lines), and civic engagement. The colloquium seeks to bring resources from the Christian theological tradition and biblical narratives of salvation to bear on these challenges facing Asian American Christianity.

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The colloquium will equip and empower current Princeton Theological Seminary students and alumni by showcasing fresh perspectives within the field of Asian American theology. The colloquium will also engage local clergy and lay Christians who serve in the Asian American ecclesial context and are involved with Asian American Christians. Finally, we believe that bringing together rigorous theological reflection and practical ministry experience into mutual dialogue will make an important contribution to the flourishing of Asian American Christianity.

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Presenters:

  • David Choi, Minister, Graceway Presbyterian Church. BA, Brown University; MDiv, Princeton Theological Seminary; PhD, Princeton Theological Seminary. Ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA).
  • KC Choi, Associate Professor of Theological Ethics and Chair, Department of Religion, Seton Hall University. BA, Yale University; MDiv, Yale Divinity School; PhD, Boston College.
  • Grace Kao, Associate Professor of Ethics, Claremont School of Theology. BA, Stanford University; MA, Stanford University; PhD, Harvard University.
  • Eun Joo Kim, Chaplain, New York Hospital Queens. BA, Cornell University; MDiv, Princeton Theological Seminary; ThM, Princeton Theological Seminary; PhD, Fordham University. Ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA).
  • Walter Kim, Lead Minister, Park Street Church (Boston). BA, Northwestern University; MDiv, Regent College; PhD, Harvard University. Licensed Minister in the Conservative Congregational Christian Conference.
  • Jonathan Tran, Associate Professor, Department of Religion, Baylor University. BA, University of California at Riverside; MDiv, The Divinity School, Duke University; PhD Duke University.

Respondents:

  • David Chao (co-organizer). BA, Yale University; MDiv, Regent College; ThM, Princeton Theological Seminary; PhD Candidate in Theology, Princeton Theological Seminary.
  • Isaac Kim (co-organizer). BA, Colgate University; MDiv, Princeton Theological Seminary. PhD Student in Theology and Ethics, Princeton Theological Seminary.
  • Gerald Liu, Assistant Professor of Worship and Preaching, Princeton Theological Seminary. BA, Washington University; MDiv, Emory University; PhD, Vanderbilt University. Ordained minister in the United Methodist Church.

Preacher:

  • Larissa Kwong Abazia, Director of Church Relations, Princeton Theological Seminary. BA, Rutgers University; MDiv, Princeton Theological Seminary. Ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA).

View the schedule (pdf)

Register Now


Registration fee:
$25 (includes lunch)
Registration deadline: Monday, March 27

For more information, contact the Office of Multicultural Relations or David Chao.

The colloquium is cosponsored by the Office of Multicultural Relations, Church Relations, Continuing Education, the Asian American Program, and the Asian Association at Princeton Seminary.

Educating faithful Christian leaders.

Associate Rector at Trinity Church, Princeton, New Jersey

Nancy Hagner, Class of 2013

“Preaching is one of the most important things we do as pastors because it’s one of the last places in our society where people will actually listen, perhaps to things they may not agree with.”